Muslim women in burqas and niqabs who refuse to show their faces in court to be jailed or given $1,500 fines under tough proposed laws

Women wearing the burqa or niqab could now face two weeks’ jail or a $1,500 fine if they refuse to show their faces in court when asked by a judge.

The new law, proposed by the Victorian Opposition, would give judges and magistrates more power to punish bad behaviour in court and settle any misconceptions around contempt of law.

The fines could be handed out to witnesses or members of the public for refusing to stand, yelling or protesting in court.

Women wearing the burqa or niqab could now face two weeks' jail or a $1,500 fine if they refuse to show their faces in court

Women wearing the burqa or niqab could now face two weeks’ jail or a $1,500 fine if they refuse to show their faces in court

The new law, proposed by the Victorian Opposition, would give judges and magistrates more power to punish bad behaviour in court

The new law, proposed by the Victorian Opposition, would give judges and magistrates more power to punish bad behaviour in court

This includes Muslim women wearing a burqa or niqab.

The law would have to be passed by the government but Opposition Leader Mathew Guy said their was a growing disrespect for authority in the court room.

‘The idea that a defendant can dictate to a judge what they will or will not do is one of the reasons why there is a growing disrespect from some people for our laws and our way of life,’ he told The Herald Sun.

The fines could be handed out to witnesses or members of the public for refusing to stand, yelling or protesting in court - including Muslim women wearing a burqa or niqab

The fines could be handed out to witnesses or members of the public for refusing to stand, yelling or protesting in court – including Muslim women wearing a burqa or niqab

‘Whether it is bikie gang members, professional protest groups, or anyone else — no one is free to pick and choose what laws they wish to follow.’

New South Wales have already adopted similar laws after a witness wearing a veil refused to remove the headpiece when giving evidence.

 

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